About Us

We hear the words all the time.
Savings. Credit Reports. Investments.

But what do these words really mean? How do they apply to you? And what can you do to prepare yourself, your child, or your student for financial success?

You've already made the first step by coming to MoneyAndStuff.info, a Web site provided by Ohio's Credit Unions.

Ohio's credit unions work hard every day to help people like you improve their financial health. Learn more about credit unions.

Ohio credit unions offer great rates and convenient services to more than 2.6 million Ohioans who are credit union members. MoneyAndStuff.info is just one more way to help educate kids, teens and adults.

We invite you to explore this site and learn about smart ways to manage your money and helpful lessons and activities to teach children and teens about money.

A great place to start exploring is on the MoneyAndStuff.info Tour!

Quotes about MoneyAndStuff

Legislators

“I want to commend the credit unions for stepping up to the plate.”

“When I was your age, I was labeled ‘slow.’ I had a speech impediment. And now, public speaking is what I do as a job. I was able to graduate with honors from college. So never give up on your dreams.”

- State Senator Lance Mason, speaking to 4th graders, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff launch at Woodland Hills Elementary School in Cleveland, 10/20/07

“The educational tools of MoneyAndStuff will keep students from getting into a personal financial crisis and is a cost-effective way of dealing with the debt cycle for students, teachers and parents so they can become smart savers and smart borrowers.”

“Ohio’s credit unions, teachers, and maybe more importantly parents, are taking on this initiative to make a difference in people’s lives.”

- State Senator Tom Sawyer, speaking to high school seniors, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at Theodore Roosevelt High School in Kent, 10/20/07

“I support your efforts. [Financial education] is an area that needs a lot more effort than it is currently getting.”

- State Senator Dale Miller, in an e-mail to the Ohio Credit Union League

“I want to thank the Ohio Credit Union League and Ohio credit unions for extending their hand to educators, students, parents, and legislators by creating MoneyAndStuff. I know it will be a great program and it will do a lot of good.”

- State Representative Ron Gerberry, speaking to high school students, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at Austintown Fitch High School in Austintown, 12/13/07

“MoneyAndStuff is so critically important for not only the students, but also the parents. It’s a great resource. I will be talking about it wherever I go.”

- State Senator Theresa Fedor, speaking to high school students, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at E.L. Bowsher High School in Toledo, 2/11/08

“I sit on the Financial Institutions, Real Estate, and Securities Committee, and there are several payday lending bills that have come before the committee. You only need to look at payday lending debt, credit card debt, and mortgage foreclosures to know how critically important financial education is. Part of what we’re dealing with on payday lending is a financial education component for consumers. I will be telling the committee that there is no need to reinvent the wheel. Credit unions have a financial education solution for us.”

- State Representative Barbara Sears, speaking to high school students, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at E.L. Bowsher High School in Toledo, 2/11/08

“Financial education in every school has been needed for a long, long time. What you (credit unions) are about here is good for America.”

“I hope every child has a real account in a credit union or a virtual account.”

“It’s not how much you make, it’s how much you save.”

- Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur, speaking to high school students, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at E.L. Bowsher High School in Toledo, 2/11/08

“My hat is off to the credit unions for doing this. As a former teacher, I particularly like the effort to reach out to parents and educators. It makes good sense that you are trying to get to kids at a very young age, so my hat is off to all of you.”

- Congressman Steve Chabot, speaking to fourth graders, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at Oyler Elementary School in Cincinnati, 2/19/08

Educators

“MoneyAndStuff.info is just fantastic. I can’t wait to let my kids get on that site! It will be a great help in shaping our future for kids.”

“I was so excited when I first learned about the MoneyAndStuff Web site that I was on it until 2:00 a.m. And it was a school night!”

- Family & Consumer Science Teacher Sandy Carter, speaking to high school students, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at E.L. Bowsher High School in Toledo, 2/11/08

“This is a wonderful Web site. We look forward to using it here at our school.”

- Assistant Principal Lin Yates, speaking to fourth graders, educators, public officials, and credit union leaders at the MoneyAndStuff event at Oyler Elementary School in Cincinnati, 2/19/08

90% of Americans who own pets also buy their animals Christmas gifts.

According to a poll, most people won't pick up money lying on the sidewalk unless it is at least a dollar.

Five percent of lottery ticket buyers buy 51% of all tickets sold.

People leave bigger tips on sunny days than they do on dreary days.

A typical $1 bill lasts about 22 months before it needs to be replaced.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing produces 38 million notes a day (about $541 million). 95% of that is used to replace old bills.

About 48% of the bills printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing are $1 bills.

Martha Washington is the only woman whose portrait has appeared on a U.S. currency note (a $1 Silver Certificate in 1886, 1891 & 1896).

If you had one billion dollars and spent $1,000 a day, it would take you 2,749 years to spend it all.

A Quarter has 119 grooves on its edge, one more than a dime.

There is a tiny "spider" hidden in the top right corner on the front of a one dollar bill (on the shield of the "1").

"Novus Ordo Seclorum" - the Latin phrase shown below the pyramid on the one dollar bill - means "New Order of The Ages".

Coins usually survive in circulation for about 30 years.

A nickel is the only U.S. coin that is called by its metal content, even though it is only 25 percent nickel (the rest is copper).