Biz Kid$ Produces Prime-Time Special on Young Social Entrepreneurs

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The producers of the Biz Kid$ TV and Web epsisodes have produced a new one-hour special for the Ashoka organization, which supports social entrepreneurship around the world.

Biz Kid$ - Three Minutes to Change the World follows four young entrepreneurs as they compete in an international contest to change the world. These semi-finalists must present their business ideas to some of the world’s most influential technology leaders in just 180 seconds.

Biz Kid$ is the credit union funded public television series that teaches kids about money management and entrepreneurship.

“The special is meant to inspire people of all ages to use innovation and technology to bring about change in their communities,” said Danielle Brown, Biz Kid$ National Program Coordinator for the National Credit Union Foundation. “The two funder credits we have on each episode for ‘America’s Credit Unions’ and ‘lovemycreditunion.org’ will be on the top and end of the special, which is great brand extension for credit unions as well as ‘Biz Kid$.’”

The special began airing in May and will continue to air in pre-prime or prime time spots in various cities on public television through 2012.


 

New Biz Kid$ textbook on banking and financial system available

TextbookA brand new high school text book on Banking and Financial Systems is now available from the experts who produce the Biz Kid$ TV epsodes for children.

The Goodheart-Willcox publishing company asked Biz Kid$ producers to author the high school textbook. This is the first children’s series to author a textbook and is also the first textbook to receive the Jump$tart Coalition’s seal of approval.

The textbook retails for $79.96. It is available to educators at a discounted price of $59.97. Online text and a six-year classroom subscription is also available at the same prices.

The entire book is branded with the Biz Kid$ look and logo and QR codes are contained in each chapter for students to connect to corresponding Biz Kid$ episode clips via mobile phones. The online and DVD version of the textbook also includes chapter on in-school credit union branches that was authored by Cathy Brorson, Outreach Coordinator at Kitsap FCU in Washington state.

 

The National Credit Union Foundation (NCUF) oversees fundraising, outreach and administrative responsibilities of Biz Kid$, which recently started its fifth season. Over the past six years, more than 290 credit unions and affiliated organizations have raised more than $13.2 million that has supported the show’s production, website and curriculum. In fact, every Biz Kid$ episode begins and ends with a narrator reminding viewers that: “Production funding for Biz Kid$ is provided by America’s Credit Unions, where people are worth more than money.”



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