Educators

MoneyAndStuff.info was created with educators in mind. Ohio's credit unions want to make it easy for you to teach financial concepts to your students (whatever ages they are).

10 easy ways to add money lessons to your classroom

 

  1. Use the MoneyAndStuff.info Classroom Activities
    Use these fun activities and games to teach money concepts to younger children using common items and simple concepts.

  2. Use MoneyAndStuff.info Classroom Lessons
    The MoneyAndStuff.info experts have compiled these comprehensive lesson plans for use in classrooms at no cost to educators. Select from three levels for each topic: Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced. Select lessons are available in Spanish.

    Lesson 1: Money Matters
    Lesson 2: Savings & Budgeting
    Lesson 3: Credit Concepts
    Lesson 4: Future Goals
    Lesson 5: Investing


    Credit Union volunteers may be available in your area to teach a session. For more information on partnering with a credit union near you, visit the partner page or contact the Ohio Credit Union League via email or at 1-800-486-2917.

  3. Print free coloring & activity pages
    Young students can use their free time to learn about money in a fun and creative way with our free coloring pages. Each one includes a simple financial lesson.

  4. Use MoneyAndStuff.info online money videos
    Kids can watch these videos anytime and learn fun games and tips while they learn about responsible money management.

  5. Order the Biz Kid$ textbook on the banking and financial system
    A brand new high school text book on Banking and Financial Systems is now available from the experts who produce the Biz Kid$ TV epsodes for children.The Goodheart-Willcox publishing company asked Biz Kid$ producers to author the high school textbook. This is the first children’s series to author a textbook and is also the first textbook to receive the Jump$tart Coalition’s seal of approval. The textbook retails for $79.96. It is available to educators at a discounted price of $59.97. Online text and a six-year classroom subscription is also available at the same prices.

  6. Use the online FoolProof curriculum
    Use up to 22 hours of online, video-driven, self-grading financial literacy instruction. Young people do all the teaching in friendly peer-to-peer instruction. You can use one module or the entire curriculum. Visit www.FoolProofTeacher.com

  7. Partner with a local credit union
    Credit unions exist to improve their members' lives with financial services. In step with their motto of "People Helping People", credit unions across Ohio provide volunteers to visit classrooms and teach financial lessons using the MoneyAndStuff.info Education Toolkit. For more information on partnering with a credit union near you, visit the partner page or contact the Ohio Credit Union League via email or at 1-800-486-2917.

  8. Open a student-run credit union in your school
    The program consists of opening a fully functioning credit union branch inside your school. Students are instructed on how to run the branch, which includes performing all duties - from accepting membership applications to processing deposits.

    Benefits of a student-run credit union

    1. Provides students with hands-on experience in a financial setting.
    2. Creates a new generation of savers.
    3. Teaches lifelong employment skills.
    4. Provides excellent experience for college applications, scholarships, and resumes
    5. Expands upon the curriculum, i.e. math and business classes.
    6. Establishes a mutual partnership between two community organizations, credit unions and the school district.
    7. Contributes to the educational system.
    8. Establishes innovative financial products and services for youth.

      Learn more and watch videos about real Student-Run Credit Unions

  9. Play the Finances 101 Game Online
    Finances 101 is a free online 'Sim' game that teaches high school students about the financial demands of the real world.

  10. Help students make a budget.

 

More Resources:

NEW! Help Kids Grow Money Skills (Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Site)

  1. Personal finance curriculum standards for 49 states and The District of Columbia
  2. Classroom Activities
  3. Classroom Lessons
  4. Financial Glossary
  5. Money videos
  6. Download the complete BizKid$ curriculum
  7. Check Writing Basics » Online | Word document | PDF document
  8. Maintaining a Checking Account » Online | Word document | PDF document
  9. Personal finance curriculum standards for 49 states and D.C.

 

 

MoneyAndStuff.info helps educators and parents fulfill The Ohio Core – Personal Finance Requirements

Amended Substitute Senate Bill 311, as codified in Ohio Revised Code §3313.603(C)(6), requires integration of economics and financial literacy within social studies classes or another class. Ohio's credit unions saw a need for financial education before the Bill was passed and created MoneyAndStuff.info to assist educators with lesson plans and other classroom activities for kids and teens.

Click here for a PDF document containing additional information on the bill.

Amended Substitute Senate Bill 311, also known as the Ohio Core, requires integration of economics and financial literacy within social studies classes or another class. Listed below are frequently asked questions about financial literacy requirements under this law.

Specifically, the law specifies:

"Each school shall integrate the study of economics and financial literacy, as expressed in the social studies academic content standards adopted by the state board of education under section 3301.079 of the Revised Code, into one or more existing social studies credits required under division (C)(6) of this section, or into the content of another class, so that every high school student receives instruction in those concepts. In developing the curriculum required by this paragraph, schools shall use available public-private partnerships and resources and materials that exist in business, industry, and through the centers for economics education at institutions of higher education in the state."

 

Ohio Dept. of Education Personal Finance Standards

The Ohio Department of Education's content standards include standards for personal financial education that lessons on MoneyAndStuff.info can help satisfy. Specifically, the Personal Financial Literacy section of the Family and Consumer Sciences Content Standards (Standard 3) requires that students must be able to "Demonstrate Personal Financial Literacy." Read Standard 3 here as a PDF. or view it on the Ohio Department of Education's website.

 

Download a PowerPoint presentation of the BizKid$ Teacher Workshop.
     
Watch how educators are using the BizKid$ curriculum in their classrooms.
     
 

MoneyAndStuff.info Video
BizKid$ in the Classroom:
Lake Elementary,
Millbury, Ohio

Watch how one Ohio teacher uses BizKid$ in her 5th grade classroom to teach her students about money and entrepreneurship. Learn more at www.bizkids.com.

From WGTE Public Media

     
     
 

MoneyAndStuff.info Video
BizKid$ in the Classroom:
St. Pius X School, Toledo, Ohio

Watch how one Ohio teacher uses BizKid$ in her 8th grade classroom to teach her students about money and entrepreneurship. Learn more at www.bizkids.com.

From WGTE Public Media
     
     

90% of Americans who own pets also buy their animals Christmas gifts.

According to a poll, most people won't pick up money lying on the sidewalk unless it is at least a dollar.

Five percent of lottery ticket buyers buy 51% of all tickets sold.

People leave bigger tips on sunny days than they do on dreary days.

A typical $1 bill lasts about 22 months before it needs to be replaced.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing produces 38 million notes a day (about $541 million). 95% of that is used to replace old bills.

About 48% of the bills printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing are $1 bills.

Martha Washington is the only woman whose portrait has appeared on a U.S. currency note (a $1 Silver Certificate in 1886, 1891 & 1896).

If you had one billion dollars and spent $1,000 a day, it would take you 2,749 years to spend it all.

A Quarter has 119 grooves on its edge, one more than a dime.

There is a tiny "spider" hidden in the top right corner on the front of a one dollar bill (on the shield of the "1").

"Novus Ordo Seclorum" - the Latin phrase shown below the pyramid on the one dollar bill - means "New Order of The Ages".

Coins usually survive in circulation for about 30 years.

A nickel is the only U.S. coin that is called by its metal content, even though it is only 25 percent nickel (the rest is copper).