Savvy Stuff: Financial Links

The Internet is full of Web sites that claim to offer financial advice. The MoneyAndStuff staff has carefully reviewed the following sites and recommends them. MoneyAndStuff.info is not responsible for content on these links.

Help Kids Grow Money Skills

NEW resources for Parents, Educators and Caregivers from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Site. Arranged by grade.

   
Parts Geek

Parts Geek Auto Money Saving Tips

A Guide to Saving Money With Your Car

Drexel

Drexel University TEEN$ Money Management

Helpful links and resources from the Philadelphia university.

Motleyfool.com

Motley Fool 's Teens and Their Money

The Motley Fool's website features a helpful article for teenagers, Ways to Save and Make Money.

Pocket Cents

Pocket Cents

A free site for school-age kids from the National Credit Union Administration that features money tools and information, including how money is made and currencies from around the world.

Chorecharts.com

Chore Charts

Like this site on Facebook and you can print out handy chore charts in a variety of designs! A great way to track kids' jobs throughout the month!

Jump$tart Reality Check

Recommended for teens who are preparing for independence. This quiz walks you through the real-world costs of living without Mom and Dad. You might be surprised at how much things cost!

hotpads.com

HotPads.com

Are you a young adult searching for a place to live? HotPads.com is a map-based real estate search engine, listing homes for sale, apartments, condos, and rental houses. The site includes a renter's guide, a calculator to help you decide whether you should buy or rent, and other handy features.

Smart About Money

Source: National Endowment for Financial Education's smartaboutmoney.org Web site.

www.bizkids.com

Biz Kid$ is a site that supports the new PBS TV show, Biz Kid$. It teaches kids how to make and manage money. The program is underwritten by America's Credit Unions.

Watch the Biz Kid$ TV Show on your local PBS station! Times below subject to change.

  • Athens, WOUB, Sundays 11AM
  • Bowling Green, WBGU, Fridays 1PM, Sundays 7PM
  • Cincinnati, WCET, Sundays 5PM
  • Cincinnati (Lexington), WCVN, Thursdays 5PM
  • Cleveland, WVIZ, Sundays 5PM
  • Columbus, WOSU, Sundays 5PM
  • Dayton, WPTD, Saturdays 8:30AM
  • Kent/Akron, WNEO/WEAO, Sundays 8:30AM
  • Toledo, WGTE, Tuesdays, 8PM, 8:30PM
  • Find more cities and times here (PDF)
  • Check your local PBS Listings.

Credit Unions: Promote Biz Kid$ with these marketing materials!

Cash Course

NEFE CashCourse

CashCourse® provides financial education resources for colleges. It’s online, it’s free, it’s noncommercial, and it’s brought to you by The National Endowment for Financial Education® (NEFE®) – the only nonprofit foundation dedicated to improving the well-being of all Americans.

www.Nefe.org

The National Endowment for Financial Education is a non-profit foundation that provides a lot of helpful financial information for high school students and educators.

Spendster

NEFE CashCourse

CashCourse® provides financial education resources for colleges. It’s online, it’s free, it’s noncommercial, and it’s brought to you by The National Endowment for Financial Education® (NEFE®) – the only nonprofit foundation dedicated to improving the well-being of all Americans.

My retirement Check

NEFE My Retirement Paycheck

A site dedicated to help you optimize your retirement paycheck by making wise decisions, brought to you by the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE).

Workshop

NEFE Financial Workshop Kits

The National Endowment for Financial Education® (NEFE®) appreciates your dedication to your community and wants to make it easy for you to provide assistance to underserved groups on their financial well-being. To aid you, this Web site gives the materials to easily teach courses to a variety of groups.

www.practicalmoneyskills.com

This site is exactly what it says. It has lesson plans for teachers, tips for families, and fun games for kids of all ages.

Thrive by Five

Tools and activities to teach pre-schoolers about money, in English and Spanish, from the Credit Union National Association.

brass logo

brass Magazine

brass Magazine provides direct, intelligent, entertaining content to young adults about the money side of life™. From planning your retirement to throwing parties, brass looks at the lives of young adults and how we handle money.

NFCC

National Foundation for Credit Counseling

The NFCC promotes financially responsible behavior by providing quality financial education and counseling services. This site is recommended for adults that are interested in reducing their debt and repairing their credit.

Stock Market

Virtual Stock Exchange

Play a free stock market game from marketwatch and learn how the stock market and risk works.

Looking for more?

Be sure to check out the MoneyAndStuff.info Financial Lesson Plans and Activities.

Need personal help or one-on-one advice?

If you need personal help, contact your credit union.

Top of the Page

90% of Americans who own pets also buy their animals Christmas gifts.

According to a poll, most people won't pick up money lying on the sidewalk unless it is at least a dollar.

Five percent of lottery ticket buyers buy 51% of all tickets sold.

People leave bigger tips on sunny days than they do on dreary days.

A typical $1 bill lasts about 22 months before it needs to be replaced.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing produces 38 million notes a day (about $541 million). 95% of that is used to replace old bills.

About 48% of the bills printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing are $1 bills.

Martha Washington is the only woman whose portrait has appeared on a U.S. currency note (a $1 Silver Certificate in 1886, 1891 & 1896).

If you had one billion dollars and spent $1,000 a day, it would take you 2,749 years to spend it all.

A Quarter has 119 grooves on its edge, one more than a dime.

There is a tiny "spider" hidden in the top right corner on the front of a one dollar bill (on the shield of the "1").

"Novus Ordo Seclorum" - the Latin phrase shown below the pyramid on the one dollar bill - means "New Order of The Ages".

Coins usually survive in circulation for about 30 years.

A nickel is the only U.S. coin that is called by its metal content, even though it is only 25 percent nickel (the rest is copper).